Who was St. Valentine?

 

We all know the contemporary and cultural references for Valentine’s Day. But do we know the origins?

St. Valentine is a 3rd-century Roman saint. He is commemorated on February 14 as that was the date of his execution in 269 A.D.

Different church traditions recognize or do not recognize Valentine. But who was he?

As the story is told in at least one version, Valintinus was arrested and imprisoned for marrying Christian couples in a time in the Roman Empire when helping Christians was considered a crime. Other stories say that he defied the order of the emperor and secretly married couples so that husbands wouldn’t have to go to war.

The celebration of St. Valentine’s Day also has many possible origins. In 14th Century England, Geoffrey Chaucer was among those whose writings associated February 14 with romantic love. During the Middle Ages, it was believed that birds paired in mid-February. This became associated with Valentine’s romance.

Just as St. Nicholas has morphed into the modern day versions of Santa Claus, St. Valentine probably never expected that he would be remembered with chocolates and flowers.

Happy Valentine’s Day.

 

Advertisements

Why Roses?

“We can complain because rose bushes have thorns, or rejoice because thorns have roses.”

– Alphonse Karr, A Tour Round My Garden

The National Retail Federation projects that American consumers will spend an average of $143.56 on Valentine’s Day. Total spending is expected to reach some $19.6 billion.

Nineteen. Point. Six. Billion.

Let that sink in for a moment.

But how did red roses come to be the flower associated with red roses.

In Victorian England sharing emotions and affections was at best a difficult thing. It just was not considered acceptable to flirt openly and even some forms of conversation were frowned upon. The Victorians used bouquets of flowers to express feelings to their loved ones in a system that became known as “floriography.” There were even special dictionaries to guide one in the understanding of the meaning of certain types of flowers.

During this time, roses became to be seen as a symbol of romantic affection.

Tomorrow, on Valentine’s Day, it’s Rose’s turn.

 Cover Photo by Clem Onojeghuo on Unsplash

Valentine’s Week: 10 Quotes About Love

This Wednesday, February 14, is Valentine’s Day. Across the nation and around the world people will be declaring their love. Whether romantic love, brotherly love, or a love for all, here are ten of our favorite quotes about love.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Have a favorite quote or story about love? Share in the comments, or give a link back to your blog!

All Saint’s Day

On this day in 1512, the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, painted by Michelangelo, is exhibited to the public for the first time.

On this day in 1512, the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, painted by Michelangelo, is exhibited to the public for the first time.

Today is All Saints’ Day, also known as All Hallows’ Day, Hallowmas, Feast of All Saints, or Solemnity of All Saints.

holy

The Write Side Shop

All Saints’ Day is a Christian festival celebrated to honor saints known and unknown. Western Christianity, including the Roman Catholic Church, the Anglican Community, the Lutheran Church and other Protestants, celebrate All Saints’ Day on the first Sunday of November.

Five Halloween Blogs that We Love

trickortreat

Thank you for your patience as we were out dealing with a family emergency last week.

We return today with Five Halloween Blogs that We Love. According to the National Retail Federation, Americans will spend some $8.4 billion on Halloween in 2016.

Keep in mind that not all of these are for the kiddies.

Neatorma brings the neatest, weirdest, and most wonderful stuff from all over the web…so they tell us. Check it out.

Halloween Love is a horror blog with a team of writers contributing their work.

The Write Side Shop

The Write Side Shop

Mystic Halloween Blog. It’s bewitching.

Instructables Halloween for when you want to Do it Yourself.

Pumpkingutter.com an amazing gallery of pumpkin carvings. Don’t miss the tutorial if you’re willing to accept the challenge.

Have a favorite Halloween blog or tradition? Share it in the comments below.

Happy Halloween!

Ten great movies for Halloween

If you love the fun of Halloween you can’t help but love some of the classic Halloween movies. No, we’re not talking about Jason, or Chucky or any of those. But the fun, somewhat more innocent movies that we all love. Or should.

Here, in no particular order, is a list of ten great movies for Halloween. They’re not all officially Halloween stories, but they all have some element of scary.

By no mean is this a list of “best of” movies. Just some favorites.

Young Frankenstein

youngfrankenstein

An all-time movie favorite. It’s hysterically funny and oh how we miss Madeline Kahn, Marty Feldman, Peter Boyle and, of course, the recently departed Gene Wilder.

Rocky Horror Picture Show

rockyhorror-300x173

It’s campy. It’s bawdy. It’s a cult classic. Truth be told after the first 30-45 minutes (after the Time Warp), it can get a little boring. Still, it’s a favorite.

Little Shop of Horrors

littleshopofhorros-300x199

The plant is scary enough, not to mention everyone’s childhood dentist.

Beetlejuice

beetlejuice-300x166

Worth it simply for the Banana Boat Song.

It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown

greatpumpkincb-300x168

It’s not Halloween without this. Sure it was a television special and not a movie. But it’s pure Halloween gold.

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets

chamberofsecrets-300x198

Any of the Harry Potter movies could be on a favorite Halloween list. They’re filled with witches and wizard and all kinds of creatures. We chose this one because of the Death Day Party.

Arachnophobia

arachnophobia-300x170

Spiders! Do we have to say anything else?

Sweeney Todd

sweeneytodd-300x199

How could you not love a movie with Johnny Depp, Alan Rickman and the amazing Helena Bonham Carter. Truth be told, the stage version is far superior, but this is an awesome movie.

Fantasia

fantasia-300x225

Included for “Night on the Bald Mountain.”

The Birds

thebirds-300x223

Leave it to Alfred Hitchcock to make birds seem scary. It’s creepy in a fascinating, can’t take your eyes away kind of way. With Tippi Hedren, Suzanne Pleshette, and Jessica Tandy.

Have some favorite Halloween movies? Tell us in the comments.

This post is based on an original 2013 post from The Write Side of My Brain.