I can’t wait to get on the road again

The everyday kindness of the back roads more than makes up for the acts of greed in the headlines.

American journalist, Charles Kuralt, was born on this day in 1934 (died 1997)

I’m old enough to remember when we sat at home and watched the evening news. So, I can remember the segments of “On the Road” with Charles Kuralt. Kuralt traveled the country in a motor home for some twenty-five years, visiting the towns and sites that you wouldn’t see by traveling the interstate.

I’ve never wanted to do the same. I mean, at least not in a motor home, or what we’d call and RV.

Still, I’ve come to enjoy getting out on the back roads and wish I could do more of it.

I used to have a job that had me flying around the country two or three times a month. Those days are long gone.

These days, I sometimes get to travel the back roads with the day job. I got to do that recently with a trip to Luray, Virginia. It made me want to do more of the driving through the winding roads through the mountains. It made me want to spend more time walking through the old towns with quaint shops and restaurants.

I had the chance to have a meeting and lunch at Gatheering Grounds in Luray. A charming coffee shop/cafe in an old store front.

I need to do more of that. In m free time.

Luray is, of course, known for the Luray Caverns which have underground walkways, and the Great Stalacpipe Organ. I didn’t visit the caverns on this trip, but may have to the next time.

Granted, it was the day job that took me there, but I look forward to the time when perhaps the day job can be traveling around to these charming little towns. There’s much to be said about getting off the commercialized, well trodden path.

I don’t get to do it often enough. But, when I do, I’ll write about it here.

William and Mary

On this day in 1693 the College of William and Mary was founded under a royal charter “make, found and establish a certain Place of Universal Study, a perpetual College of Divinity, Philosophy, Languages, and other good arts and sciences…to be supported and maintained, in all time coming.”

It was named for reigning monarchs King William III and Queen Mary II and is the second oldest college in the United States (after Harvard University, 1636) and the oldest in the Commonwealth of Virginia.

According to Wikipedia: William & Mary educated American Presidents Thomas Jefferson (third), James Monroe (fifth), and John Tyler (tenth) as well as other key figures important to the development of the nation, including the fourth U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Marshall of Virginia, Speaker of the House of Representatives Henry Clay of Kentucky, sixteen members of the Continental Congress, and four signers of the Declaration of Independence, earning it the nickname “the Alma Mater of the Nation.”

In other news, American composer, conductor, and pianist, John Williams, was born on this day in 1932. Williams is known and recognized for film scores that include the Star Wars series, Jaws, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Superman: The Movie, E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, the Indiana Jones series, the first two Home Alone films, the first two Jurassic Park films, Schindler’s List, and the first three Harry Potter films.

By the Fireside

The only thing we have to fear is fear itself.

32nd President of the United States, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, was born on this day in 1882. He died in office on April 12, 1945, just weeks before World War II ended.

Roosevelt is remembered for many things, including an expansion of government through many of his programs. But he was also known for his fireside chats, a series of 28 evening radio addresses given between 1933 and 1944.

In those addresses he spoke about the Emergency Banking Act in response to the Banking Crisis, the recession, New Deal initiatives, and the progress of World War II.

In times of national despair and uncertainty, Roosevelt was the voice of assurance and comfort.

A list of the addresses with either the transcript or the audio, can be found at this link on Wikipedia.