Constitution Day 2019

 

On this day in 1787, the United States Constitution was signed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

This day celebrates the adoption of the United States Constitution and those who have become U.S. citizens The law establishing the holiday was created in 2004 when West Virginia Senator Robert Byrd proposed an amendment to the Omnibus spending bill. Previously, the day was known as “Citizenship Day.”

On June 21, 1788 New Hampshire becaome the ninth and last state necessary to ratify the Constitution.

When was the last time you read the Constitution? If it’s been a while, check it out at this link.

Or at least check it out on Schoolhouse Rock.

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Do you remember?

On this day in 2001, a series of coordinated suicide attacks killing 2,996 people using four aircraft hijacked by 19 members of al-Qaeda. Two aircraft crashed into the World Trade Center in New York City, a third crashed into The Pentagon in Arlington County, Virginia, and a fourth into a field near Shanksville, Pennsylvania.

When was the last time you read it?

 The Signing of the Declaration of Independence by John Trumbull.

When in the Course of human events it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature’s God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.

Keep reading here.

Friday Experiments, Ramblings and Updates

pexels-photo-891677.jpegHere it is, a sunny Friday in March and we’re not sure if winter is yet behind us.  In terms of production work here at Historic Occasions, I thought it would be good to give you an update on where things are, or aren’t.

I’m directing Doublewide, Texas at CAT Theatre in June.  The cast is complete and we have our first read-thru on Sunday evening.  I’m excited and looking forward to getting to work with some amazing people.

My script, Clean Dry Socks: Diary of a Doughboy, is complete and has, at this point, been submitted to one contest and there will be two more submissions in April.  While I can’t share the details, there’s also a very strong possibility that the show will be produced here locally within the next year.

Speaking of the next year, I’ve got a pending contract to direct a show in Spring 2019.  I can’t yet share the details, but the announcement will be made in early April.

On more exciting news, about which I must be even more vague, a random Facebook conversation this past week may lead to a dream opportunity to direct, produce, or act in…maybe all three, one of my favorite shows.  The first meeting is Tuesday and there’s lots talk and dream about.

So, why all this rambling on a Friday on this blog and not my regular blog, The Write Side of My Brain?  In part, because I’m sitting in Panera and figuring out how I can, indeed, blog from the iPad.  Work with me, I’ll be sixty in a few months.  So, this is somewhat revolutionary.

Plus, while I post here randomly, I’m taking a two-week break from the other blog.  Just some time to regroup and figure out the balance between the writing and the production.

It’s also a bit of a shift for this blog.  For years, Historic Occasions has been the framework for meeting and event planning, but that’s shifting to theatrical productions and historical events.

Don’t get us wrong, we can still produce a kickass meeting for you, whether it’s a conference, or a wedding reception, or just for grins.

But, this blog, as well as this  company, is a work in progress.  Stick with me here and you’ll be able to follow that progress.

Have a good weekend.

 

Copy of Declaration Found Behind Wallpaper

The document, which belonged to James Madison, is one of 200 facsimiles commissioned in the 19th century

From the Smithsonian Magagine.

Within 40 years of its signing in 1776, the Declaration of Independence was starting to show signs of aging and wear. So in 1820, John Quincy Adams commissioned printer William Stone to make 200 facsimiles of the precious document. As Michael E. Ruane reports for the Washington Post, one of these meticulous copies, long believed to have been lost, recently resurfaced in Texas.

Read more.