Why Roses?

“We can complain because rose bushes have thorns, or rejoice because thorns have roses.”

– Alphonse Karr, A Tour Round My Garden

The National Retail Federation projects that American consumers will spend an average of $143.56 on Valentine’s Day. Total spending is expected to reach some $19.6 billion.

Nineteen. Point. Six. Billion.

Let that sink in for a moment.

But how did red roses come to be the flower associated with red roses.

In Victorian England sharing emotions and affections was at best a difficult thing. It just was not considered acceptable to flirt openly and even some forms of conversation were frowned upon. The Victorians used bouquets of flowers to express feelings to their loved ones in a system that became known as “floriography.” There were even special dictionaries to guide one in the understanding of the meaning of certain types of flowers.

During this time, roses became to be seen as a symbol of romantic affection.

Tomorrow, on Valentine’s Day, it’s Rose’s turn.

 Cover Photo by Clem Onojeghuo on Unsplash

I’m Sorry

thanksgiving1

It’s not you, it’s me.

Or something like that.

When we relaunched this blog in October we had high hopes for where it would take us. But the blog just isn’t going where we thought it would and it’s taking a bit more time out of our daily schedule that we’d like it to. With the holidays coming up it’s just going to be one more source of stress.

We’re not saying we won’t be back. But we’re taking the rest of 2016 to regroup, rethink, and perhaps…perhaps…relaunch in the new year.

Best to all.

Thanks for stopping by.

Do you still send Christmas cards?

vintagecard

With email and Facebook and texting the sending of letters by U.S. Mail has certainly decreased, and along with that the sending of Christmas cards.

The custom of sending cards at Christmas dates back to 1843 England when Sir Henry Cole, an Assistant Keeper at the Public Record Office (now the Post Office) had an idea along with his artist friend, John Horsley, to design and sell the first Christmas card for about a shilling (about 8 cents in today’s economy). By the early 1900s the custom of Christmas cards had spread across Europe and was especially popular in Germany.

The U.S. saw the beginning of Christmas cards in the 1840s, but they were too expensive for most people to afford. Louis Prang, a printer originally from Germany, started the first mass production of Christmas cards in 1875. In 1915 John C. Hall and two brothers launched Hallmark Cards.

Christmas cards are still fund to send, and in this electronic age they’re fund to receive.

Did you send cards this year?