Why Roses?

“We can complain because rose bushes have thorns, or rejoice because thorns have roses.”

– Alphonse Karr, A Tour Round My Garden

The National Retail Federation projects that American consumers will spend an average of $143.56 on Valentine’s Day. Total spending is expected to reach some $19.6 billion.

Nineteen. Point. Six. Billion.

Let that sink in for a moment.

But how did red roses come to be the flower associated with red roses.

In Victorian England sharing emotions and affections was at best a difficult thing. It just was not considered acceptable to flirt openly and even some forms of conversation were frowned upon. The Victorians used bouquets of flowers to express feelings to their loved ones in a system that became known as “floriography.” There were even special dictionaries to guide one in the understanding of the meaning of certain types of flowers.

During this time, roses became to be seen as a symbol of romantic affection.

Tomorrow, on Valentine’s Day, it’s Rose’s turn.

 Cover Photo by Clem Onojeghuo on Unsplash

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Valentine’s Week: 10 Quotes About Love

This Wednesday, February 14, is Valentine’s Day. Across the nation and around the world people will be declaring their love. Whether romantic love, brotherly love, or a love for all, here are ten of our favorite quotes about love.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Have a favorite quote or story about love? Share in the comments, or give a link back to your blog!

On the Fourth Sunday of Advent

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God became man.

But you, Bethlehem Ephrathah,
though you are small among the clans[b] of Judah,
out of you will come for me
one who will be ruler over Israel,
whose origins are from of old,
from ancient times.
Therefore Israel will be abandoned
until the time when she who is in labor bears a son,
and the rest of his brothers return
to join the Israelites.
He will stand and shepherd his flock
in the strength of the Lord,
in the majesty of the name of the Lord his God.
And they will live securely, for then his greatness
will reach to the ends of the earth.

Micah 5:2-4

The fourth Sunday of Advent prepares for the birth of Christ.

Advent traditions differ as sometimes do the meanings of the candles. Traditionally the fourth candle means love and represents the love of Christ who came to the earth sinless to take on himself the sins of the world.

Greater love has no one than this: to lay down one’s life for one’s friends.

John 13:15

Love Came Down at Christmas

Love came down at Christmas,
Love all lovely, love divine;
Love was born at Christmas,
Star and angels gave the sign.

Worship we the Godhead,
Love incarnate, love divine;
Worship we our Jesus:
But wherewith for sacred sign?

Love shall be our token,
Love be yours and love be mine,
Love to God and all men,
Love for plea and gift and sign.

Cristina Rosetti

The Second Sunday of Advent

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The virgin will conceive and give birth to a son, and they will call him Immanuel (which means “God with us”).

– Matthew 1:23

The focus of the Second Sunday of Advent has traditionally been that of Divine Love. The love of a God who would send his son to earth to pay the price of sin.

Jesus said:

Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind. This is the first and greatest commandment. And the second is like it: Love your neighbor as yourself. All the Law and the Prophets hang on these two commandments.

Matthew 22:37-40

With all of the horrible, painful news that floods the airways today it is sometimes difficult to remember love. It seems as though there is very little love out there.

And when people of faith turn to prayer and love, sometimes they get mocked. Read more about that here.

But Advent and Christmas is a time for people of faith to remember that there is hope. Hope that was born in a manger.